Home Lesson Plans Activities Field Trips Standards 01 How Humans Think While Understanding the Natural World - Science as Inquiry02 What we Know Today About the World Around Us - Historical Perspectives01 Doing Scientific Inquiry02 Living the Values of Inquiry03 Using Unifying Concepts and Themes04 Doing Safety05 Relating the Nature of Technology to Science01 Understanding Inquiry & Character of Knowledge02 Interdependence of Science Technology & Society03 MALAMA I KA AINA: Sustainability04 Unity & Diversity05 Interdependence of Organisms06 Cycle of Matter and Energy Flow07 Biological Evolution08 Heredity09 Cells, Tissues, and Organs10 Human Development11 Wellness12 Learning and Human Behavior13 Nature of Matter14 Energy, Its Transformation and Matter15 Forces, Motion, Sound and Light16 Universe17 Forces of the universe18 Earth in the Solar System19 Forces that Shape the Earth
Standard Number:0
Hawaii State Standards Toolkit
National Standards: History and Nature of Science K-4
National Standards: History and Nature of Science 5-8

Field Trips
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Standard 02 Activities

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In other words,students value honesty as an important characteristic in life and in experimenting; value critical-mindedness as an important way of evaluating information; value the need for evidence to support statements of beliefs and explainations; value objectivity as criteria necessary for problem-solving; value the quality of open-mindedness as a means of evaluating their/others' ideas; realize that a questioning attitude is necessary to validate, contradict, clarify, or expand on an idea or statement; believe in themselves and are self-directed; and value science as a way of thinking and knowing.

For example, students demonstrate that they value honesty when they report data accurately even when the data contradicts their hypothesis. Students deomonstrate that they value openmindedness when they consider and evaluate ideas presented by other points of view.

Domain 1: How Humans Think While Understanding the Natural World

Habits of the Mind

Standard 02: LIVING THE VALUES, ATTITUDES, AND COMMITMENTS OF THE INQUIRING MIND: Students apply the values, attitudes, and commitments characteristic of an inquiring mind.

Standard Number:1

K-3

HONESTY

Report observations accurately.

CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

Ask many questions starting with What, Where, Why, Whom and How, to gather information about their "wonderings".

OBJECTIVITY

Examine many perspectives of a question, situation or problem.

OPEN-MINDEDNESS

Examine ideas presented by others.

QUESTIONING

Ask "wondering" questions.

SELF-DIRECTED

Share new experiences and knowledge learned from individual investigations.

VALUE SCIENCE

Ask questions and describe the wonderings about the world around us.

4-5

HONESTY

Report observations accurately.

CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

Ask many questions starting with What, Where, Why, Whom and How, to gather information about their "wonderings".

OBJECTIVITY

Examine many perspectives of a question, situation or problem.

OPEN-MINDEDNESS

Examine ideas presented by others.

QUESTIONING

Ask "wondering" questions.

SELF-DIRECTED

Share new experiences and knowledge learned from individual investigations.

VALUE SCIENCE

Ask questions and describe the wonderings about the world around us.

K-4 National Standards: Understanding About Scientific Inquiry

  • Science investigations involve asking and answering a question and comparing the answer with what scientists already know about the world.

  • Scientists use different kinds of investigations depending on the questions they are trying to answer. Types of investigations include describing objects, events, and organisms; classifying them; and doing a fair test (experimenting).

  • Simple instruments, such as magnifiers, thermometers, and rulers, provide more information than scientists obtain using only their senses.

  • Scientists develop explanations using observations (evidence) and what they already know about the world (scientific knowledge). Good explanations are based on evidence from investigations.

  • Scientists make the results of their investigations public; they describe the investigations in ways that enable others to repeat the investigations.

  • Scientists review and ask questions about the results of other scientists work.

  • 5-8 National Standards: Understanding About Scientific Inquiry

  • Different kinds of questions suggest different kinds of science investigations. Some investigations involve observing and describing object, organisms, or events; some involve collecting specimens; some involve experiments; some involve discovery of new objects and phenomena; and some involve making models.

  • Current scientific knowledge and understanding guide scientific investigations. Different scientific domains employ different methods, core theories, and standards to advance scientific knowledge and understanding.

  • Mathmatics is important in all aspects of scientific inquiry.

  • Technology used to gather data enhances accuracy and allows scientist to analyze and quantify result of investigations.

  • Scientific explanations emphasize evidence, have logically consistant arguements, and use scientific principles, models, and theories. The scientific community accepts and uses such explanations until displaced by better scientific ones. When such displacement occurs, science advances.

  • Science advances through legitimate skepticism. Asking questions and querying other scientists' explanations is part of scientific inquiry. Scientist evaluate the explanations proposed by toher scientist by examining evidence, comparing evidence, and suggesting alternative explanations for the same observation.

  • Scientific investigations sometimes result in new ideas and phenomena for study, generate new methods or procedures for an investigation, or develop new technologies to improve the collection of data. All of these results can lead to new investigations.

  • Standard Number:0

    Kindergarden

    HONESTY

    Tells about observations.

    CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

    Asks questions about What, Where, and Whom.

    OBJECTIVITY

    No indicator for this grade level benchmark.

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

    Listens to what others are saying.

    QUESTIONING

    Asks "wondering" questions.

    SELF-DIRECTED

    Share new experiences and knowledge learned.

    VALUE SCIENCE

    Asks questions and describes wonderings about the world around us.

    Grade 1

    HONESTY

    Tells about observations.

    CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

    Asks many questions about What, Where, Why and Whom.

    OBJECTIVITY

    Looks at different ways of viewing a situation.

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

    Asks others about their ideas.

    QUESTIONING

    Asks "wondering" questions.

    SELF-DIRECTED

    Shares new experiences and knowledge learned from investigations.

    VALUE SCIENCE

    Ask questions and describes wonderings about the world around us.

    Grade 2

    HONESTY

    Tells about observations accurately.

    CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

    Asks questions starting with What, Where, Why, Whom and How, to find answers to their questions.

    OBJECTIVITY

    Looks at different ways of viewing a question, situation or problem.

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

    Tests ideas presented by others.

    QUESTIONING

    Asks "wondering" questions.

    SELF-DIRECTED

    Share new experiences and knowledge learned from investigations.

    VALUE SCIENCE

    Ask questions and describes wonderings about the world around us.

    Grade 3

    The Student:

    p>HONESTY

    Report observations accurately.

    CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

    Ask many (different) questions starting with What, Where, Why, Whom and How, to gather information about their "wonderings".

    OBJECTIVITY

    Examine (carefully observes) many (different) perspectives (viewpoints) about a question, situation or problem.

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

    Examines (tests) ideas presented by others.

    QUESTIONING

    Ask "wondering" questions.

    SELF-DIRECTED

    Shares new experiences and their own knowledge learned from individual investigations.

    VALUE SCIENCE

    Asks questions and describes wonderings about the world around us.

    Grade 4

    The Student:

    HONESTY

    1. Report all observations accurately.
    2. Acknowledges work done by others.

    CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

    1. Validates (corroborates) multiple sources of information (texts, periodicals, web sites, and people) to support research.

    OBJECTIVITY

    1. Looks at perspectives(points of view) about a question, situation or problem that bear on possible solutions.

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

    1. Accepts that ideas, conclusions, and expectations may change.

    QUESTIONING

    1. Asks questions to clarify.

    SELF-DIRECTED

    1. Plans and carries out tasks as a member of a group.
    2. Plans and carries out tasks as an individual.

    VALUE SCIENCE

    Gives examples of how science explains (tells us about) what is happening in the world around us.

    Grade 5

    The Student:

    HONESTY

    1. Report all observations accurately and precisely (conforming to rules).
    2. Acknowledges work done by others.

    CRITICAL-MINDEDNESS

    1. Validates and evaluates (determines value) multiple sources of information (texts, periodicals, web sites, and people) to support research.

    OBJECTIVITY

    1. Examines (looks at or studies) many perspectives (points of view) about a question, situation, or problem and conciders how they bear on possible solutions.

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

    1. Acknowledges (recognizes) that ideas, conclusions, and expectations may change.

    QUESTIONING

    1. Asks questions to clarify.
    2. Asks questions to expand an idea or statement.

    SELF-DIRECTED

    1. Plans and carries out tasks as a member of a group.
    2. Plans and carries out tasks as an individual.

    VALUE SCIENCE

    Asks questions about and gives examples of how science explains (tells us about) what is happening in the world around us.